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Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project (refer to: Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project)
Date 2022.08.03

Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project

The Jüdisches Museum Westfalen (Jewish Museum of Westphalia) has published a brochure on its provenance research project, which has been funded by the German Lost Art Foundation since May 2020 and is now complete. 60 pages in length, the brochure presents the results of one and a half years of scholarly work. More details: Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project …

Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia (refer to: Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia)
Date 2022.07.29

Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia

The foundation Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha has investigated the provenance of a total of 41 human skulls that were added to the ducal collection during the colonial period. The project Provenance and History of the Collection of Indonesian Skulls at Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha was funded by the German Lost Art Foundation. On the Indonesian side, the research was sponsored by the Institute for Dayak Studies-21 in Palangka Raya, southern Borneo. More details: Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia …

Date 2022.07.25

German Lost Art Foundation supports project on works from Benin at the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main

The German Lost Art Foundation is funding a six-month research project on works from the Kingdom of Benin (Nigeria) which are part of the collection at the Weltkulturen Museum (Museum of World Cultures) in Frankfurt. The aim of the project is to investigate the provenance of these objects in more detail and to reconstruct the circumstances of their acquisition. In particular, an attempt is being made to clarify whether any of the objects – and if so which ones – arrived in Europe as a result of the British “punitive expedition" in 1897, eventually ending up at what was then the Völkermuseum. More details: German Lost Art Foundation supports project on works from Benin at the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main …

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Date 2022.05.25

Under the first round of proposals in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation approved around 1.6 million euros for nine research projects dealing with colonial contexts

When we talk of former colonies, we tend to mean regions in the so-called Global South. But colonial oppression took place in the far north, too: the Sámi suffered under so-called “Nordic colonialism”. The only indigenous societies in Europe – those situated in the northern regions of Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia – lost most of the material evidence of their culture as a result of oppression by the nation states. The most important Sámi collection outside Northern Europe is currently to be found in the Museum Europäischer Kulturen (MEK – Museum of European Cultures) in Berlin-Dahlem. This inventory is now to be systematically processed: as part of a project funded by the German Lost Art Foundation and in close cooperation with Sámi partners, the MEK is investigating the origins of some 1,000 objects and photographs. More: Under the first round of proposals in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation approved around 1.6 million euros for nine research projects dealing with colonial contexts …

Date 2022.05.19

In the first round of funding in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation granted some 3.1 million euros for 24 provenance research projects on the subject of Nazi-looted property

On the morning of 6 May 1933, a group of German students stormed the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft (Institute for Sexual Science) in Berlin-Tiergarten, rioting and looting. Four days later, the looted writings were burned on Berlin’s Opernplatz. Institute director Magnus Hirschfeld later estimated that 12,000 of his books had fallen victim to the National Socialist regime’s book burning. Large parts of his library and archive went up in flames, while the remaining archives, patient files, works of art, demonstration items and sexual objects were destroyed, stolen, sold and distributed. Hirschfeld later reacquired some of these items in exile with the aim of re-establishing his institute in Paris. But this was not to be: the sex education expert, who is today considered a pioneer of queer emancipation movements, died in Nice on his 67th birthday in 1935. As part of a project funded by the German Lost Art Foundation, the society founded in his name – Magnus-Hirschfeld-Gesellschaft e.V. – will now attempt to reconstruct the lost collection and the confiscation that continued until 1936. The aim is to produce an illustrated catalogue that can be used by museums and collections to check their holdings. More: In the first round of funding in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation granted some 3.1 million euros for 24 provenance research projects on the subject of Nazi-looted property …