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Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project (refer to: Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project)
Date 2022.08.03

Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project

The Jüdisches Museum Westfalen (Jewish Museum of Westphalia) has published a brochure on its provenance research project, which has been funded by the German Lost Art Foundation since May 2020 and is now complete. 60 pages in length, the brochure presents the results of one and a half years of scholarly work. More details: Jewish Museum of Westphalia publishes brochure on provenance research project …

Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia (refer to: Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia)
Date 2022.07.29

Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia

The foundation Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha has investigated the provenance of a total of 41 human skulls that were added to the ducal collection during the colonial period. The project Provenance and History of the Collection of Indonesian Skulls at Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha was funded by the German Lost Art Foundation. On the Indonesian side, the research was sponsored by the Institute for Dayak Studies-21 in Palangka Raya, southern Borneo. More details: Stiftung Schloss Friedenstein Gotha completes project to establish the provenance of 41 skulls from Indonesia …

Date 2022.07.25

German Lost Art Foundation supports project on works from Benin at the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main

The German Lost Art Foundation is funding a six-month research project on works from the Kingdom of Benin (Nigeria) which are part of the collection at the Weltkulturen Museum (Museum of World Cultures) in Frankfurt. The aim of the project is to investigate the provenance of these objects in more detail and to reconstruct the circumstances of their acquisition. In particular, an attempt is being made to clarify whether any of the objects – and if so which ones – arrived in Europe as a result of the British “punitive expedition" in 1897, eventually ending up at what was then the Völkermuseum. More details: German Lost Art Foundation supports project on works from Benin at the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main …

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Date 2022.11.02

In the second round of funding in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation granted some 2.1 million euros for 19 provenance research projects on the subject of Nazi-looted property

In the second round of funding in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation granted some 2.1 million euros for 19 provenance research projects on the subject of Nazi-looted property.In the second round of funding in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation is awarding funds for 19 research projects on the subject of Nazi-looted property. In this second round of proposals, the Executive Board of the German Lost Art Foundation has approved some 2.1 million euros for provenance research to be conducted at museums, libraries and academic institutions as well as for private applicants. More: In the second round of funding in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation granted some 2.1 million euros for 19 provenance research projects on the subject of Nazi-looted property …

Date 2022.05.25

Under the first round of proposals in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation approved around 1.6 million euros for nine research projects dealing with colonial contexts

When we talk of former colonies, we tend to mean regions in the so-called Global South. But colonial oppression took place in the far north, too: the Sámi suffered under so-called “Nordic colonialism”. The only indigenous societies in Europe – those situated in the northern regions of Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia – lost most of the material evidence of their culture as a result of oppression by the nation states. The most important Sámi collection outside Northern Europe is currently to be found in the Museum Europäischer Kulturen (MEK – Museum of European Cultures) in Berlin-Dahlem. This inventory is now to be systematically processed: as part of a project funded by the German Lost Art Foundation and in close cooperation with Sámi partners, the MEK is investigating the origins of some 1,000 objects and photographs. More: Under the first round of proposals in 2022, the German Lost Art Foundation approved around 1.6 million euros for nine research projects dealing with colonial contexts …